G2R2

August 06-19, 2018 - Novosibirsk, Russia

Accepted contributions







The scientific program of the G2R2-conference consists of 50-minutes invited talks and 25-minutes contributed talks with no parallel sessions.

All accepted abstracts are published in the book of abstracts

The topics of the G2R2-conference are widely presented by different branches of mathematics such as graph theory, group theory, geometry, topology, algebraic combinatorics, algebraic graph theory, coding theory and designs, representation theory of groups, computer science, discrete mathematics.

Main Conference Speakers

 
Leonid Bokut

Leonid Bokut

Title: Groebner-Shirshov bases for groups, semigroups, categories, and Lie algebras.

Abstract: What is now called Groebner and Groebner-Shirshov (GS) bases method was initiated independently by A.I.Shirshov (1962), H.Hironaka (1964) and B.Buchberger (1965). We will emphasize on GS bases for Coxeter and braid groups, plactic monoid, simplicial and cyclic categories, semisimple Lie algebras, Shirshov-Cartier-Cohn counter examples. This is joint work with Yuqun Chen.

Leonid Bokut

Leonid Bokut

Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Groebner-Shirshov bases for groups, semigroups, categories, and Lie algebras

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Sebastian M. Cioabă

Sebastian M. Cioabă

Title: The smallest eigenvalues of Hamming, Johnson and other graphs.

Abstract: The smallest eigenvalue of graphs is closely related to other graph parameters such as the independence number, the chromatic number or the max-cut. In this talk, I will describe the well connections between the smallest eigenvalue and the max-cut of a graph that have motivated various researchers such as Karloff, Alon, Sudakov, Van Dam, Sotirov to investigate the smallest eigenvalue of Hamming and Johnson graphs. I will describe our proofs of a conjecture by Van Dam and Sotirov on the smallest eigenvalue of (distance-j) Hamming graphs and a conjecture by Karloff on the smallest eigenvalue of (distance-j) Johnson graphs and mention some open problems. This is joint work with Andries Brouwer, Ferdinand Ihringer and Matt McGinnis.

Sebastian M. Cioabă

University of Delaware, USA

The smallest eigenvalues of Hamming, Johnson and other graphs

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Sebastian M. Cioabă
Victor Buchstaber

Victor Buchstaber

Title: Cyclically 5-edge connected graphs, Fullerenes and Pogorelov polytopes.

Abstract: In this talk, we discuss fruitful connections between classical and recent results of the graph theory, the polytope theory, hyperbolic geometry and algebraic topology.

A 3-valent planar 3-connected graph is cyclically 5-edge connected (c5-connected) if it has at least 5 vertices and no two circuits can be separated by cutting fewer than 5 edges. A graph is strongly cyclically 5-edge connected (c*5-connected) if in addition any separation of the graph by cutting 5 edges leaves one component that is a simple circuit of 5 edges. These notions are well-known and play an important role in the graph theory. By the result of G.D. Birkhoff (1913), the famous Four Colour Theorem for planar graphs can be reduced to the class of c*5-connected graphs. In 1974 D. Barnette and J.W. Butler shown independently that any c5-connected graph can be obtained from the graph of dodecahedron by a simple set of operations. An analogous description for c*5-connected graphs was found by D. Barnette in 1977. Later a part of this result was rediscovered by T. Inoue (2008) in the context of hyperbolic geometry.

There is a remarkable geometric characterisation of c5-connected graphs due to A.V. Pogorelov (1967) and E.M. Andreev (1970): a combinatorial 3-polytope can be realised in Lobachevsky space as a bounded polytope with right dihedral angles if and only if its graph is c5-connected. We refer to such combinatorial polytopes as Pogorelov polytopes (𝒫-polytopes). Generalising the classical construction of Löbell (1931), A.Yu. Vesnin in 1987 described a way to produce a hyperbolic 3-manifold from any Pogorelov polytope by endowing it with an additional structure related to the hyperbolic reflection group (this structure consists of /2-vectors assigned to the facets of the polytope). An important example of this additional structure arises from the Four Colour Theorem. A.Yu. Vesnin also conjectured that hyperbolic manifolds arising from 4-colourings of one special series of Pogorelov polytopes (the so-called Löbell polytopes or barrels) are isometric if and only if the 4-colourings are equivalent. In 2017 V.M. Buchstaber, N.Yu. Erokhovets, M. Masuda, T.E. Panov and S. Park proved that hyperbolic manifolds arising from any Pogorelov polytopes are isometric if and only if the polytopes with additional structures are com- binatorially equivalent. Using this result V.M. Buchstaber and T.E. Panov proved that hyperbolic manifolds arising from 4-colourings of any Pogorelov polytopes are isometric if and only if the colourings are equivalent, thereby verifying Vesnin's conjecture.

According to T. Doslic (2003), the class of 𝒫-polytopes contains fullerenes, i.e. simple 3-polytopes with only 5- and 6-gonal faces. V.M. Buchstaber and N.Yu. Erokhovets (2017) obtained the results describing the class of 𝒫-polytopes constructively:

(1) Any 𝒫-polytope except for the k-barrels can be obtained from the 5- or the 6-barrel by a sequence of two-edges-truncations and connected sums with 5-barrels along 5-gons.

(2) Any fullerene except for the 5-barrel and the (5, 0)-nanotubes can be obtained from the 6-barrel by a sequence of (2, 6; 5, 5)-, (2, 6; 5, 6)-, (2, 7; 5, 6)-, (2, 7; 5, 5)- truncations such that all intermediate polytopes are either fullerenes or 𝒫-polytopes with facets 5-, 6- and at most one additional 7-gon adjacent to a 5-gon.

Victor Buchstaber

Steklov Mathematical Institute, Moscow State University, Russia

Cyclically 5-edge connected graphs, Fullerenes and Pogorelov polytopes

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Victor Buchstaber
Edwin van Dam

Edwin van Dam

Title: Applications of semidefinite programming, symmetry, and algebra to graph partitioning problems.

Abstract: We will present semidefinite programming (SDP) and eigenvalue bounds for several graph partitioning problems.
The graph partition problem (GPP) is about partitioning the vertex set of a graph into a given number of sets of given sizes such that the total weight of edges joining different sets - the cut - is optimized. We show how to simplify known SDP relaxations for the GPP for graphs with symmetry so that they can be solved fast, using coherent algebras.
We then consider several SDP relaxations for the max-k-cut problem, which is about partitioning the vertex set into k sets (of arbitrary sizes) such that the cut is maximized. For the solution of the weakest SDP relaxation, we use an algebra built from the Laplacian eigenvalue decomposition - the Laplacian algebra - to obtain a closed form expression that includes the largest Laplacian eigenvalue of the graph. This bound is exploited to derive an eigenvalue bound for the chromatic number of a graph. For regular graphs, the new bound on the chromatic number is the same as the well-known Hoffman bound. We demonstrate the quality of the presented bounds for several families of graphs, such as walk-regular graphs, strongly regular graphs, and graphs from the Hamming association scheme.
If time permits, we will also consider the bandwidth problem for graphs. Using symmetry, SDP, and by relating it to the min-cut problem, we obtain best known bounds for the bandwidth of Hamming, Johnson, and Kneser graphs up to 216 vertices.

Edwin van Dam

Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Applications of semidefinite programming, symmetry, and algebra to graph partitioning problems

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Edwin van Dam
Gavrilyuk Alexander

Alexander Gavrilyuk

Title: On mixed Moore-Cayley graphs.

Abstract: A graph is said to be mixed if it contains both undirected edges and directed arcs. In this talk, we give a brief survey on the topic and describe an algebraic approach based on the socalled Higman's method in the theory of association schemes, which enables us to rule out the existence of mixed Moore-Cayley graphs of certain orders.

Alexander Gavrilyuk

Pusan National University, South Korea

On mixed Moore-Cayley graphs

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Gavrilyuk Alexander
Sergey Goryainov

Sergey Goryainov

Title: Several results on cliques in strongly regular graphs.

Abstract: In this talk we discuss recent results related to cliques and equitable partitions into cliques in strongly regular graphs. The talk is based on joint work with Rosemary Bailey, Peter Cameron, Rhys Evans, Alexander Gavrilyuk, Vladislav Kabanov, Dmitry Panasenko, Leonid Shalaginov, Alexander Valuzhenich.

Sergey Goryainov

Sergey Goryainov

Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, Krasovskii Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Several results on cliques in strongly regular graphs

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Vsevolod Gubarev

Vsevolod Gubarev

Title: PC-polynomial on graph and its largest root.

Abstract: Given a graph G, we are interested on the properties of β(G), the largest root of PC-polynomial, a polynomial with integer coefficients depending on the numbers of cliques in G. The number β(G) is deeply related to partially commutative algebras, Lovász local lemma and matrices. We find a graph on which β(G) reaches the largest value if the numbers n = |V| and k = |E| are fixed. We find the upper bound on β(G): β(G) < n - (0.941k)/n for n>>1. We obtain new versions of Lovász local lemma. We investigate the analogues of Nordhaus-Gaddum inequalities for β(G). Applying random graphs, we prove that the average value of β(G) on graphs with n vertices asymptotically equals ≈ 0.672n.

Vsevolod Gubarev

Vsevolod Gubarev

University of Vienna, Austria, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

PC-polynomial on graph and its largest root

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Štefan Gyürki

Štefan Gyürki

Title: On directed strongly regular graphs.

Abstract: A directed strongly regular graph (DSRG) with parameters (n,k,t,λ,μ) is a regular directed graph on n vertices with valency k such that every vertex is incident with t undirected edges; the number of directed paths of length 2 directed from a vertex x to another vertex y is λ, if there is an arc from x to y and μ otherwise. In the talk we present a few constructions of DSRGs.

Štefan Gyürki

Matej Bel University, Slovakia

On directed strongly regular graphs

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Štefan Gyürki
Bobo Hua

Bobo Hua

Title: Combinatorial curvature for infinite planar graphs.

Abstract: For any planar graph, its ambient space S2 or R2 can be endowed with a canonical piecewise flat metric by identifying its faces with regular Euclidean polygons, called the polyhedral surface. The combinatorial curvature of a planar graph is defined as the generalized Gaussian curvature of its polyhedral surface up to the normalization 2\π. The total curvature of an infinite planar graph with nonnegative combinatorial curvature will be shown to be an integral multiple of 1/12 and the number of vertices with non-vanishing curvature is at most 132. Moreover, if the total curvature is positive, then the automorphism group of an infinite planar graph with nonnegative combinatorial curvature is finite. This is based on joint works with Yanhui Su (Fuzhou University).

Bobo Hua

Fudan University, China

Combinatorial curvature for infinite planar graphs

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Bobo Hua
Tatsuro Ito

Tatsuro Ito

Title: The Terwilliger algebra of a tree.

Abstract: Let Γ be a finite connected simple graph. Let X denote the vertex set of Γ and V = ⊕x∈Xx the standard module, i.e., the vector space for which X is an orthonormal basis. Fix a vertex x0 ∈ X and let Xi be the set of vertices that have distance i from x0. Then the standard module V is decomposed into the orthogonal sum V = ⊕Di=0Vi* , where Vi* = ⊕x∈Xix. The Terwilliger algebra 𝔗 of Γ is by defnition the subalgebra of End(V) generated by the adjacency matrix A of Γ and the orthogonal projections Ei* : V → Vi*, 0≤i≤D. Let G be the automorphism group of Γ and H the stabilizer in G of the base vertex x0:G=Aut(Γ), H = Gx0. Then it is easy to see that 𝔗 is contained in the centralizer algebra of H, i.e., each element of 𝔗 commutes with the action of every element of H:𝔗⊆HomH(V,V).
In this talk, we discuss the Terwilliger algebra of a tree. Precisely speaking, we assume Γ is a rooted tree with x0 the root and we let 𝔗 be the Terwilliger algebra of Γ with respect to x0. We show: (1) 𝔗= HomH(V,V), i.e., 𝔗 coincides with the centralizer algebra of H. (2) The 𝔗-module V determines the rooted tree Γ up to isomorphism. In particular, 𝔗=End(V) holds if and only if the rooted tree Γ does not have any symmetry, i.e., H = 1.
This talk is based on joint work with Shuang-Dong Li, Jing Xu, Masoud Karimi and Yizheng Fan. We acknowledge that Jack Koolen conjectured: For almost all finite connected simple graphs, 𝔗=End(V) holds regardless the base point x0. This conjecture motivated our study on the Terwilliger algebra of a tree.

Tatsuro Ito

Tatsuro Ito

Anhui University, China

The Terwilliger algebra of a tree

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Alexander A. Ivanov

Alexander A. Ivanov

Title: Locally Projective Graphs of GF(2)-type.

Abstract: Consider a connected graph Γ with a family 𝓛 of complete subgraphs (called lines), and possessing a vertex-transitive automorphism group G preserving 𝓛. It is assumed that for every vertex x of Γ there is a G(x)-bijection π(x) between the set 𝓛(x) of lines containing x and the point-set of a projective GF(2)-space. There is a number of important examples of such locally projective graphs of GF(2)-type where both classical and sporadic simple groups appear among the automorphism groups. The ultimate goal is to classify these graphs up to their local isomorphisms. This was achieved by V.I. Trofimov, S.V. Shpectorov and the present author for the case where the lines are of size 2. An approach of extending the classification to the case where the lines are of size 3 will be discussed in the lecture.

Alexander A. Ivanov

Imperial College London, UK

Locally Projective Graphs of GF(2)-type

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Alexander A. Ivanov
Jack Koolen

Jack Koolen

Title: Recent progress on graphs with fixed smallest eigenvalue.

Abstract: In the 1970's Cameron et al. showed that connected graphs with smallest eigenvalue at least -2 are generalized line graphs, if the number of vertices is at least 36. In this talk I will discuss recent progress on graphs with fixed smallest eigenvalue.

Jack Koolen

University of Science and Technology of China (USTC)

Recent progress on graphs with fixed smallest eigenvalue

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Jack Koolen
Naihuan Jing

Louis H Kauffman

Title: Counting Colorings of Cubic Graphs via a Generalized Penrose Bracket

Abstract: A proper edge coloring of a cubic graph is a coloring of the edges of the graph using three colors so that three distinct colors appear at each node of the graph. It is well-known that the four-color theorem is equivalent to the statement that every isthmus-free planar cubic graph has at least one proper edge coloring. Roger Penrose gave a graphical recursion formula, the Penrose Bracket, that can be seen to count the number of proper edge colorings of a planar cubic graph. The Penrose Bracket does not count the number of colorings of non-planar cubic graphs. For example, the original Penrose Bracket vanishes on the graph K3,3 while this graph has 12 proper edge colorings. In this talk we extend the Penrose Bracket to include any non-planar cubic graph so that the new formula counts the number of proper edge colorings of that graph. The method we use can be explained in the original Penrose context of abstract tensors. We use an immersion into the plane of the (possibly) non-planar graph, and we associate a new tensor to each immersion crossing as well as associating an epsilon tensor to each cubic node of the graph. The result is a new state summation formula that correctly counts the number of colorings of the graph. We will discuss the possible applications of this new Penrose Bracket to map coloring and we will discuss related ways to examine the colorings of cubic graphs. We shall discuss the relationships of this work with knot theory and virtual knot theory.

Naihuan Jing

Louis H Kauffman

University of Illinois, USA

Counting Colorings of Cubic Graphs via a Generalized Penrose Bracket

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István Kovács

István Kovács

Title: Skew-morphisms and regular Cayley maps for dihedral groups.

Abstract: Let G be a finite group having a factorisation G = AB into subgroups A and B with B cyclic and A ∩ B = 1, and let b be a generator of B. The associated skew-morphism is the bijective mapping f : A → A well defined by the equality baB = f(a)B where a ∈ A. The motivation of studying skew-morphisms comes from topological graph theory. A Cayley map for the group A is an embedding of a Cayley graph of A into an orientable surface such that a chosen global orientation induces at each vertex the same cyclic permutation of generators. If the group of map automorphisms is regular on arcs, the map is called regular. It is well-known that regular Cayley maps for A arise from those skew-morphisms of A that admit a generating orbit which is closed under taking inverses. Regular Cayley maps for cyclic groups were classified by Conder and Tucker (2014). In this talk, we discuss regular Cayley maps for dihedral groups. This is joint work with Young Soo Kwon.

István Kovács

University of Primorska, Slovenia

Skew-morphisms and regular Cayley maps for dihedral groups

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István Kovács
Sergey Lando

Sergey Lando

Title: Delta-matroids and Vassiliev invariants.

Abstract: Vassiliev (finite type) invariants of knots can be described in terms of weight systems. These are functions on chord diagrams satisfying so-called 4-term relations. There is also a natural way to define 4-term relations for abstract graphs, and graph invariants satisfying these relations produce weight systems: to each chord diagram its intersection graph is associated. The notion of weight system can be extended from chord diagrams, which are orientable embedded graphs with a single vertex, to embedded graphs with arbitrary number of vertices that can well be nonorientable. These embedded graphs are a tool to describe finite order invariants of links: the vertices of a graph are in one-to-one correspondence with the link components. We are going to describe two approaches to constructing analogues of intersection graphs for embedded graphs with arbitrary number of vertices. One approach, due to V. Kleptsyn and E. Smirnov, assigns to an embedded graph a Lagrangian subspace in the relative first homology of a 2-dimensional surface associated to this graph. Another approach, due to S. Lando and V. Zhukov, replaces the embedded graph with the corresponding delta-matroid, as suggested by A. Bouchet in 1980's. In both cases, 4-term relations are written out, and Hopf algebras are constructed. Vyacheslav Zhukov proved recently that the two approaches coincide.

Sergey Lando

National Research University Higher School of Economics, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Russia

Delta-matroids and Vassiliev invariants

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Sergey Lando
Mario Mainardis

Mario Mainardis

Title: Recent developments in Majorana representations of the symmetric groups.

Abstract: We will present some recent developments in Majorana representations of the symmetric groups obtained jointly with Clara Franchi and Alexander Ivanov.

Mario Mainardis

University of Udine, Italy

Recent developments in Majorana representations of the symmetric groups

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Mario Mainardis
Atsushi Matsuo

Atsushi Matsuo

Title: Around symmetries of vertex operator algebras.

Abstact: A vertex operator algebra (VOA) is a vector space equipped with a countably many binary operations subject to some axioms, and interesting groups such as the Monster simple group appear as automorphism groups of VOAs. In this talk, I will survey various results related to the automorphism groups of VOAs focusing on those which arose from my own activities from late 90's to 00's. The topics include Matsuo-Norton trace formula, conformal design, and Matsuo algebra.

Atsushi Matsuo

The University of Tokyo, Japan

Around symmetries of vertex operator algebras

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Atsushi Matsuo
Tomaž Pisanski

Tomaž Pisanski

Title: Symmetries and Combinatorics of Finite Antilattices.

Abstract: Antilattices, known also as rectangular quasilattices, form one of the simplest varieties of non-commutative lattices. In this talk we will explore the combinatorics of finite antilattices via their generating matrices. We will also investigate their substructures, congruences, symmetries, and in particular, their connection with orthogonal latin squares. The inspiration comes from a paper by Jonathan Leech (2005) on magic squares and simple quasilattices. This is work in progress with Karin Cvetko Vah.

Tomaž Pisanski

University of Ljubljana, University of Primorska, Slovenia

Symmetries and Combinatorics of Finite Antilattices

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Tomaž Pisanski
Leonard H. Soicher

Leonard H. Soicher

Title: Cliques and colourings in GRAPE.

Abstract: Many problems in discrete mathematics and finite geometry boil down to the problem of finding or classifying cliques of a given size in some graph, which often has a large group of automorphisms. The GRAPE package for GAP provides extensive facilities to exploit graph symmetries for clique finding and classification. Recently, I have used these facilities to develop programs (for inclusion in GRAPE) which exploit graph symmetry for the proper vertex- colouring of a graph and the determination of its chromatic number. I will talk about this recent development, and give concrete examples and applications of the clique and colouring machinery in GRAPE, so that you can apply this machinery to your own research problems.

Leonard H. Soicher

Queen Mary University of London, UK

Cliques and colourings in GRAPE

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Leonard H. Soicher
Evgeny Vdovin

Evgeny Vdovin

Title: On 2-closures of primitive solvable permutation groups.

Abstract: Denote by Ω the set {1, . . . , n}, by Symn the symmetric group of degree n. Denote the action of Symn on Ωk coordinatewise, i.e. given σ ∈ Symn we define σ:(x1,...,xk)→(x1σ,...,xkσ). If G≤Symn define the orbits of G on Ωk by Δ1(k), . . . ,Δm(k). Following H.Wielandt we define the k-closure of G (we denote it G(k)) by {σ ∈ Symn | Δi(k)σ=Δi(k) for i = 1, . . . , m}. In the talk we discuss the possible structure of G(2) for solvable primitive G≤Symn.

Evgeny Vdovin

Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

On 2-closures of primitive solvable permutation groups

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Evgeny Vdovin
Norman Wildberger

Norman Wildberger

Title: Combinatorial Games on Graphs, Coxeter-Dynkin diagrams, and the geometry of root systems.

Abstract: The Coxeter-Dynkin graphs, particularly the ADE graphs and their affine variants, feature prominently in dozens of topics in group theory, Lie algebras, combinatorics and many other areas. Explaining this ubiquity is a tantalising problem. In this talk we consider the graphs as central, and explore two remarkable games, the Numbers game and the Mutation game, that generate quite a lot of associated mathematics around ADE diagrams. Rich lattices and posets will figure, the geometry of root systems and connections with representation theory will appear, and we will also present an intriguing challenge.

Norman
Wildberger

University of New South Wales, Australia

Combinatorial Games on Graphs, Coxeter-Dynkin diagrams, and the geometry of root systems

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Norman Wildberger
Jiping Zhang

Jiping Zhang

Title: Character degree graphs of finite groups.

Abstract: Character degree graphs of finite groups have been investigated intensively in recent years. We will report some new developments.

Jiping Zhang

Jiping Zhang

Peking University, China

Character degree graphs of finite groups

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Registered participants

Abrosimov Nikolay, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Aljohani Mohammed, Taibah University, Saudi Arabia

Avgustinovich Sergey, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Baykalov Anton, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

Berikkyzy Zhanar, University of California, USA

Bernard Matthew, University of California, USA

van Bevern Rene, Novosibirsk State University, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Bokut Leonid, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Brodhead Katie, Florida A&M University, USA

Buchstaber Victor, Steklov Mathematical Institute, Moscow State University, Russia

Buturlakin Alexander, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Chanchieva Marina, Gorno-Altaisk State University, Russia

Chen Sheng, Harbin Institute of Technology, China

Chen Huye, China Three Gorges University, China

Cho Eun-Kyung, Pusan National University, South Korea

Churikov Dmitry, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Cioabă Sebastian M. , University of Delaware, USA

Dai Yi, Harbin Institute of Technology, China

van Dam Edwin, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Dedok Vasily, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Dobrynin Andrey, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Dogra Riya, Shiv Nadar University, India

Drozdov Dmitry, Gorno-Altaisk State University, Russia

Dudkin Fedor, Novosibirsk State University, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics

El Habouz Youssef, University ibn Zohr, Morocco

Erokhovets Nikolai, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia

Evans Rhys, Queen Mary University of London, UK

Fadeev Stepan, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Fu Zhuohui, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Fuladi Niloufar, Sharif University of Technology, Iran

Galt Alexey, Novosibirsk State University, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Gavrilyuk Alexander, Pusan National University, South Korea

Glebov Aleksey, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Golmohammadi Hamid Reza, University of Tafresh, Iran

Goncharov Maxim, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Gonzalez Yero Ismael, Universidad de Cadiz - Escuela Politecnica Superior, Spain

Gorshkov Ilya, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk, Russia

Goryainov Sergey, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, Krasovskii Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Grechkoseeva Maria, Novosibirsk State University, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics

Gubarev Vsevolod, University of Vienna, Austria, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Gyürki Štefan, Matej Bel University, Slovakia

He Yunfan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Hua Bobo, Fudan University, China

Ilyenko Christina, Ural Federal University, Russia

Ito Keiji, Tohoku University, Japan

Ito Tatsuro, Anhui University, China

Ivanov Alexander A., Imperial College London, UK

Jin Wanxia, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Jing Naihuan, North Carolina State University, USA

, University of Southampton, UK

Kabanov Vladislav, Krasovskii Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Kamalutdinov Kirill, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Kauffman Louis H, University of Illinois, USA

Kaushan Kristina, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Khomyakova Eraterina, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Kim Jan, Pusan National University, Korea

Kolesnikov Pavel, Novosibirsk State University, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics

Kondrat'ev Anatoly, Krasovskii Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Konstantinov Sergey, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Konstantinova Elena, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Koolen Jack, University of Science and Technology of China, China

Kovács István , University of Primorska, Slovenia

Krotov Denis, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Kwon Young Soo, Yeungnam University, Korea

Lando Sergey, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Russia

Li Hong-Hai, Jiangxi Normal University, China

Li Caiheng, Southern University of Science and Technology, China

Lin Boyue, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Lisitsyna Maria, Budyonny Military Academy of Telecommunications, Russia

Lytkina Daria, Siberian State University of Telecommunications and Information Sciences, Russia

Mainardis Mario, University of Udine, Italy

Mamontov Andrey, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Maslova Natalia, Krasovskii Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Matkin Ilya, Chelyabinsk State University, Russia

Matsuo Atsushi, The University of Tokyo, Japan

Mattheus Sam, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Mednykh Alexander, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Mednykh Ilya, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Medvedev Alexey, Universite de Namur, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Minigulov Nikolai, Krasovskii Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Mityanina Anastasiya, Chelyabinsk State University, Russia

Mogilnykh Ivan, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Morales Ismael, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain

Mozhey Natalya, Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Belarus

Mulazzani Michele, University of Bologna, Italy

Munemasa Akihiro, Tohoku University, Japan

Muzychuk Mikhail, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

Nasybullov Timur, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

Nedela Roman, University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic

Nedelova Maria, University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic

Oldani Gianfranco, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Ositsyn Alexander, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Panasenko Alexander, Novosibirsk State University

Panasenko Dmitry, Chelyabinsk State University, Russia

Parshina Olga, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia, Institut Camille Jordan, Universite Claude Bernard, France

Pisanski Tomaž, University of Ljubljana, University of Primorska, Slovenia

Potapov Vladimir, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Puri Akshay A, Shiv Nadar University, India

Qian Chengyang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Revin Danila, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Rogalskaya Kristina, Sberbank Technology, Russia

Ryabov Grigory, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Simonova Anna, Moscow Google Developer Group, Russia

Shalaginov Leonid, Chelyabinsk State University, Russia

Shushueva Tamara, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Soicher Leonard H., Queen Mary University of London, UK

Solov'eva Faina, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Song Mengmeng, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Sotnikova Ev, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Staroletov Alexey, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Smith Dorian, USA

Su Li, Jiangxi Normal University, China

Takhonov Ivan, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Taranenko Anna, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Tetenov Andrei, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Toktokhoeva Surena, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Tsiovkina Ludmila, Krasovskii Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Valyuzhenich Alexandr, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Vasil'eva Anastasia, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Vasil'ev Andrey, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Vdovin Evgeny, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Vorob'ev Konstantin, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Vuong Bao, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Wang Guanhua, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Wang Hui, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Wang Jingyue, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Wildberger Norman, University of New South Wales, Australia

Wu Yaokun, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Xiong Yanzhen, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Xu Zeying, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Yakovleva Tatyana, Novosibirsk State University, Russia

Yakunin Kirill, Ural Federal University, Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Russia

Yang Yuefeng, China University of Geosciences, China

Yang Zhuoke, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Russia

Yin Yukai, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Yu Tingzhou, Hebei Normal University, China

Zaw Soesoe, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Zhao Da, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Zhang Jiping, Peking University, China

Zhang Yue, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Zhao Yupeng, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China

Zhu Yan, Shanghai University, China

Zhu Yinfeng, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Zvezdina Maria, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

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